CARMEN BALLET

Music by Rodion Shchedrin after Georges Bizet
Choreography by Ananatoly Emelianov

Attempt to interpret Prosper Merimee’s short story by means of means of ballet theater isn’t new. To a premiere of the well-known opera of Georges Bizet heroes found it scenic life in the one-act ballet “Carmen and Toreador”, put young then Marius Petipa at the Madrid theater. And then choreographers repeatedly addressed to this plot, each time offering the interpretation of the literary primary source. In 1967 on a scene of the Bolshoi theater of Russia took place the prime minister of the one-act ballet “Carmen suite” in whom the main part was performed by great Maya Plisetskaya. Specially for it the ballet was put by the Cuban ballet master Alberto Alonso.

Libretto

In the middle of ballet — tragic destiny of Gipsy Carmen and the soldier who has fallen in love ,his name was Hoze whom Carmen left for the sake of the young Torero. Relationship of heroes and Carmen’s death by hand to Hoze is predetermined by Rock. Carmen’s history is decided in the symbolical plan that is strengthened by unity of a scene of action (a bullfight platform).

Georges Bizet (25 October 1838 – 3 June 1875), registered at birth as Alexandre César Léopold Bizet, was a French composer of the Romantic era. Best known for his operas in a career cut short by his early death, Bizet achieved few successes before his final work, Carmen, which has become one of the most popular and frequently performed works in the entire opera repertoire.

During a brilliant student career at the Conservatoire de Paris, Bizet won many prizes, including the prestigious Prix de Rome in 1857. He was recognised as an outstanding pianist, though he chose not to capitalise on this skill and rarely performed in public. Returning to Paris after almost three years in Italy, he found that the main Parisian opera theatres preferred the established classical repertoire to the works of newcomers. His keyboard and orchestral compositions were likewise largely ignored; as a result, his career stalled, and he earned his living mainly by arranging and transcribing the music of others. Restless for success, he began many theatrical projects during the 1860s, most of which were abandoned. Neither of his two operas that reached the stage in this time – Les pêcheurs de perles and La jolie fille de Perth – were immediately successful. After the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 – 1871, during which Bizet served in the National Guard, he had little success with his one-act opera Djamileh, though an orchestral suite derived from his incidental music to Alphonse Daudet’s play L’Arlésienne was instantly popular. The production of Bizet’s final opera, Carmen, was delayed because of fears that its themes of betrayal and murder would offend audiences.

After its premiere on 3 March 1875, Bizet was convinced that the work was a failure; he died of a heart attack three months later, unaware that it would prove a spectacular and enduring success.

Bizet’s marriage to Geneviève Halévy was intermittently happy and produced one son. After his death, his work, apart from Carmen, was generally neglected. Manuscripts were given away or lost, and published versions of his works were frequently revised and adapted by other hands. He founded no school and had no obvious disciples or successors. After years of neglect, his works began to be performed more frequently in the 20th century. Later commentators have acclaimed him as a composer of brilliance and originality whose premature death was a significant loss to French musical theatre.

Rodion Shchedrin (born 16 December 1932) is a Soviet and Russian composer and pianist, winner of the Lenin Prize (1984), USSR State Prize (1972), and the State Prize of the Russian Federation (1992), and is a former member of the Interregional Deputy Group (1989–1991). He is also a citizen of Lithuania and Spain).

Shchedrin was born in Moscow into a musical family—his father was a composer and teacher of music theory. He studied at the Moscow Choral School and Moscow Conservatory (graduating in 1955) under Yuri Shaporin (composition) and Yakov Flier (piano). He was married to the well-known ballerina Maya Plisetskaya from 1958 until her death in 2015.

Shchedrin’s early music is tonal, colourfully orchestrated and often includes snatches of folk music, while some later pieces use aleatoric and serial techniques. In the west the music of Shchedrin has won popularity mainly through the work of Mstislav Rostropovich who has made several successful recordings.

Among his works are the ballets The Little Hump-backed Horse (1955), Carmen Suite (1971), an arrangement by Tony Vernon, Anna Karenina (1971, on the novel by Leo Tolstoy), and Lady with a Lapdog (1985); the operas Not Only Love (1961), and Dead Souls (1976, after Nikolai Gogol’s novel); piano concertos, symphonies, chamber and piano music and other works. He composed 24 Preludes and Fugues after he heard those of Shostakovich. Also remarkable is his Polyphonic Notebook.

He has written five concertos for orchestra: the first, variously translated as Naughty Limericks or Mischievous Folk Ditties (neither of which completely get the gist of the Russian which refers to a chastushka, an irreverent, satirical kind of folk song) is by far the best known, and was the work which first established him on the international stage.The second of the Concertos for Orchestra was subtitled Zvony (The Chimes), and was premiered by the New York Philharmonic under Leonard Bernstein as one of the many commissions in honor of the orchestra’s 125th anniversary. The third Concerto for Orchestra is based on old music of Russian provincial circuses. Concerto 4, Khorovody (round dances), was written in 1989, and Concerto 5, Four Russian Songs, was written in 1998.